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How to Resize a Partition using Gparted on Linux?

July 2015

Operating systems like Linux provide partitioning software to resize partitions without any data loss. It is possible to resize a partition using Gparted in a easy and a convenient way. Gparted partitioning software is available for free download. To modify the partition with Gparted, it has to be downloaded then burned into a blank CD. This CD will be used as a bootable CD in order to resize the partition on Linux. Follow these easy instructions to resize a partition using Gparted on Linux without losing any data. The process may take some time to complete.

How to Resize a Partition using Gparted on Linux?




If you have a partition and you want to enlarge or reduce it without losing data you might find Gparted does what you want.

To use:
  • Download GParted
  • Download InfraRecorder, a program to burn the ISO image of GParted on a blank CD
  • Restart the computer by putting the CD into the drive. (Please ensure that your BIOS is properly configured to boot from CD-ROM: change the boot sequence BIOS)
  • When prompted, choose to ignore the boot options, unless you want to declare a specific device:


  • Choose the language:


  • Choose the keymap:


  • Choose the screen depth:


  • Choose the resolution:


  • Gparted should then launch and display a screen showing disks and partitions:


  • Click to repartition the disk (/dev/hda1 is usually the first IDE drive, /dev/hda2 for the second. /Dev/sda1 is the first SCSI or Serial-ATA, /dev/sda2 in the second, etc.)
  • Click "Resize":

  • A window then prompts you to resize the partition:




When you are happy, click "Apply."

Warning: After this stage, it will be impossible to undo.
For unlimited offline reading, you can download this article for free in PDF format:
How-to-resize-a-partition-using-gparted-on-linux.pdf

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Published by jak58. - Latest update by Paul Berentzen
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