Configure RIS server [Solved/Closed]

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 sagar -
Hello,



i have 100 PC in my Lab. I want to Install OS in all system by using RIS. But i am facing many problem. So give me solution How to configure DNS , AD , DHCp after all Remote Instalation Server ( RIS ).

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Dear

Set Up RIS

1. Log on as a user with administrative privileges.
2. Click Start, click Run, type risetup.exe, and then click OK to start the RIS Setup Wizard.
3. When the "Welcome" screen appears, click Next.
4. Type the drive letter and folder in which the RIS files are stored, and then click Next. For example, you might type E:\RemoteInstall, and then click Next.
5. After the RIS Setup Wizard copies the files, you are be prompted to enable or disable the RIS service, and the options are:
* Respond to client computers requesting service. If you select this option, RIS is enabled, and it will respond to client computers that are requesting service.
* Do not respond to unknown client computers. If you select this option, RIS only responds to known client computers.
6. Click Respond to client computers requesting service, and then click Next.
7. You are then prompted for the location of the client operating system installation files. Put the client operating system CD-ROM in the server CD-ROM drive, and then click Next.

NOTE: Microsoft only supports the use of Microsoft media when creating a client operating system image. The use of non-Microsoft media is not supported.
8. Type the folder name for the client operating system installation files on the RIS server, and then click Next.
9. Type a friendly description for the operating system image. This is displayed to users after they start a remote client and run the Client Installation Wizard.
10. Click Next, click Finish, and then click Done.


Authorize RIS in Active Directory

After you install RIS, the RIS server must be authorized in Active Directory. Authorization determines control of which RIS servers can serve client computers on the network. If the RIS server is not authorized in Active Directory, client computers that request service cannot contact the RIS server.

NOTE: To authorize a RIS server in Active Directory, you must be logged on as an enterprise administrator or a domain administrator of the root domain.

1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DHCP.
2. In the left pane, right-click DHCP, and then click Manage Authorized Servers.
3. If your server is not listed, click Authorize, type the name or the IP address of the RIS server, and then click OK.

NOTE: If you are prompted to confirm the RIS server, verify the name and IP address, and then click OK.
4. Click Close, and then quit the DHCP console.


Set User Permissions
With RIS, clients can install their own client operating system. The users must also be granted permissions for creating computer accounts in the domain. To make it possible for users to create computer accounts anywhere in the domain:

1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Active Directory Users and Computers.
2. In the left pane, right-click your domain name, and then click Delegate Control.
3. In the Delegation of Control Wizard, click Next.
4. Click Add.
5. Type the name of the group that requires permission to add computer accounts to the domain, and then click OK.
6. Click Next.
7. Click to select the Join a computer to the domain check box, and then click Next.
8. Click Finish.


Install Clients By Using RIS

This section describes how to install a client operating system on a computer that contains a network adapter that supports PXE DHCP-based boot ROM. To install a client operating system:

1. Make sure that the network adapter is set as the primary boot device in the computer BIOS.
2. Restart the client computer from the network adapter.
3. When you are prompted to do so, press F12 to start the download of the Client Installation Wizard.
4. At the "Welcome" screen, press ENTER.
5. Type a user name that has permissions to add computer accounts to the domain, and then type the domain name and password for this user.
6. Press ENTER.
7. When you receive a warning message that states that all data on the client computer hard disk will be deleted, press ENTER.
8. A computer account and a global unique ID for this workstation are displayed. Press ENTER to start Setup.
9. If you are prompted to do so, follow the instructions on the screen to complete the client operating system installation.


Remote Installation Boot Disk Option
You can use the remote installation boot disk with computers that do not contain a network adapter that supports PXE DHCP-based boot ROM. The boot disk is designed to simulate the PXE startup process.

Rbfg.exe is a utility for creating network installation disks, and it is located in the RemoteInstall\Admin folder on every RIS server.


Creating a Boot Disk By Using the Windows Remote Boot Disk Generator
To create a remote installation boot disk:

1. Locate the drive:\RemoteInstall\Admin\I386 folder on the RIS server, where drive is the drive on which RIS is installed.
2. Double-click the Rbfg.exe file.
3. Put a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive, and then click Create Disk.
4. When you prompted to create another disk, click No, and then click Close.
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Configure Windows Server 2003 DNS Service

1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DNS to open the DNS MMC snap-in.
2. In the navigation pane, click the DNS Server object for your server, right-click the server object, and then click Configure a DNS server to start the Configure DNS server Wizard.
3. Click Next, click one of the following options, and then click Next:
* Create a forward lookup zone (recommended for small networks)
This server is authoritative for the DNS names for local resources but forwards all other queries to an ISP or other DNS servers. The Wizard will configure the root hints but not create a reverse lookup zone.
* Create forward and reverse lookup zones (recommended for large networks)
This server can be authoritative for forward and reverse lookup zones. It can be configured to perform recursive resolution, forward queries to other DNS servers, or both. The wizard configures the root hints.
* Configure root hints only (recommended for advanced users only)
The wizard configures the root hints only. You can configure forward and reverse lookup zones and forwarders later.
4. If you clicked Create a forward lookup zone or Create forward and reverse lookup zone in step 3, use one of the following procedures to complete the steps.

Create a Forward Lookup Zone

1. Click This server maintains the zone, and then click Next.
2. In the Zone name box, type the name of the zone. Make sure that the name is the same as the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) DNS domain name for which the zone is authoritative. Click Next.
3. Click one of the following three options:
* Click Allow only secure dynamic updates if the zone is integrated into Active Directory.
* Click Allow any dynamic updates for all other zones (that is, zones that are not necessarily integrated into Active Directory).
* Click Do not allow dynamic updates if all updates to this zone are to be made manually. Click Next.
4. Click Yes, it should forward queries to DNS servers with the following IP address to forward queries for names external to your network to another DNS server located elsewhere on the Internet. Typically, you use this option if you use your ISP's DNS server for external name resolution queries. Type the forwarding DNS server's IP address.

If you do not want to resolve names outside your network by forwarding queries to an external server, click No, it should not forward queries. Click Next, and then click Finish.

Create Forward and Reverse Lookup Zones

1. Click Create forward and reverse lookup zones (recommended for large networks), and then click Next.
2. Click Yes, create a forward lookup zone now (recommended), and then click Next.
3. Click Primary zone, click to select the Store the zone in Active Directory (available only if DNS server is a domain controller) check box, and then click Next.
4. Click the appropriate replication scope option, and then click Next.
5. In the Zone name box, type the name of the zone. Make sure that the name is the same as the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) DNS domain name for which the zone is authoritative. Click Next.
6. Click one of the following three options:
* Click Allow only secure dynamic updates if the zone is integrated into Active Directory.
* Click Allow any dynamic updates for all other zones (that is, zones that may not be integrated into Active Directory).
* Click Do not allow dynamic updates if all updates to this zone are to be made manually. Click Next.
7. Click Yes, create a reverse lookup zone now, and then click Next.
8. Click Primary zone, click to select the Store the zone in Active Directory (available only if DNS server is a domain controller) check box, and then click Next.
9. Click the appropriate zone replication method, and then click Next.
10. Click Network ID, and then type the Network ID portion of your IP address that is exposed to the internet. For example, if your IP address is 10.10.10.10, and the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, the network address portion of the IP address is 10.10.10. Click Next.
11. Click the appropriate zone dynamic update method, and then click Next.
12. Click Yes, it should forward queries to DNS servers with the following IP address to forward queries for names external to your network to another DNS server located elsewhere on the Internet. Typically you would use this option if you use your ISP's DNS server for external name resolution queries. Type the forwarding DNS server's IP address in the space below.

If you prefer not to resolve names outside your network by forwarding queries to an external server, click No, it should not forward queries. Click Next, and then click Finish.
hi
it is very nise
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How to Configure the DHCP Service

After you have installed the DHCP service and started it, you must create a scope, which is a range of valid IP addresses that are available for lease to the DHCP client computers on the network. Microsoft recommends that each DHCP server in your environment have at least one scope that does not overlap with any other DHCP server scope in your environment. In Windows Server 2003, DHCP servers in an Active Directory-based domain must be authorized to prevent rogue DHCP servers from coming online. Any Windows Server 2003 DHCP Server that determines itself to be unauthorized will not manage clients.

How to Create a New Scope

1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click DHCP.
2. In the console tree, right-click the DHCP server on which you want to create the new DHCP scope, and then click New Scope.
3. In the New Scope Wizard, click Next, and then type a name and description for the scope. This can be any name that you want, but it should be descriptive enough so that you can identify the purpose of the scope on your network (for example, you can use a name such as "Administration Building Client Addresses"). Click Next.
4. Type the range of addresses that can be leased as part of this scope (for example, use a range of IP addresses from a starting IP address of 192.168.100.1 to an ending address of 192.168.100.100). Because these addresses are given to clients, they must all be valid addresses for your network and not currently in use. If you want to use a different subnet mask, type the new subnet mask. Click Next.
5. Type any IP addresses that you want to exclude from the range that you entered. This includes any addresses in the range described in step 4 that may have already been statically assigned to various computers in your organization. Typically, domain controllers, Web servers, DHCP servers, Domain Name System (DNS) servers, and other servers, have statically assigned IP addresses. Click Next.
6. Type the number of days, hours, and minutes before an IP address lease from this scope expires. This determines how long a client can hold a leased address without renewing it. Click Next, and then click Yes, I want to configure these options now to extend the wizard to include settings for the most common DHCP options. Click Next.
7. Type the IP address for the default gateway that should be used by clients that obtain an IP address from this scope. Click Add to add the default gateway address in the list, and then click Next.
8. If you are using DNS servers on your network, type your organization's domain name in the Parent domain box. Type the name of your DNS server, and then click Resolve to make sure that your DHCP server can contact the DNS server and determine its address. Click Add to include that server in the list of DNS servers that are assigned to the DHCP clients. Click Next, and then follow the same steps if you are using a Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) server, by adding its name and IP address. Click Next.
9. Click Yes, I want to activate this scope now to activate the scope and allow clients to obtain leases from it, and then click Next.
10. Click Finish.
11. In the console tree, click the server name, and then click Authorize on the Action menu.