BSOD

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Kamon358 Posts 7 Registration date Sunday May 20, 2012 Status Member Last seen January 26, 2014 - Jan 24, 2014 at 01:04 PM
xpcman Posts 19532 Registration date Wednesday October 8, 2008 Status Contributor Last seen June 15, 2019 - Jan 26, 2014 at 08:39 PM
Hello,

My pc is showing BSOD while i'm doing a normal activity in my pc, it shows up after a while that my pc has turned on. The BSOD code is different 4A or 3B.

Can some one help my!

4 replies

xpcman Posts 19532 Registration date Wednesday October 8, 2008 Status Contributor Last seen June 15, 2019 1,835
Jan 24, 2014 at 02:13 PM
These codes are not very informative. I suggest you test the memory cards since failed/failing memory is one of the frequent causes of BSOD.

Good Luck
0
Kamon358 Posts 7 Registration date Sunday May 20, 2012 Status Member Last seen January 26, 2014
Jan 25, 2014 at 03:24 AM
I did a memory test with MEMTEST86 and it showed some errors but i dont know the meaning of them, so i wrote the content from the test witch is below:


Memtest86 v4.3.6 Intel Core i5-2400 @ 3.10GHz

CPU Clk : 3110 MHZ : Pass100% ##################
L1 Cache: 64K 87276 MB/s: Test100% ##################
L2 Cache: 256K 46249 MB/s: Test #7 [Moveing inversions, 32 bit pattern]
L3 Cache: 6144K 28503 MB/s: Testing: 6144M - 8192M 2048 of 8173M
Memory : 8173M 15859 MB/s: Patern 00000001

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CPU: 0123 :CPUs_Found: 4 Cpu_Mask: ffffffff
State: WWW\ :CPUs_Started: 4 Cpus_Active: 1

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Time 0:31:44 Iterations: 1 AdrsMode:64Bit Pass: 0 Errors: 940

Error Confidence Value: 154
Lowest Error Address: 0021cad2004 - 8650.8MB
Highest Error Address: 0021cad3fbc - 8950.8MB
Bits in Error Mask: 00040000
Bits in Error - Total: 1 Min: 1 Max: 1 Avg:1
Max Contiguous Errors: 8

Test Errors
0 0
1 0
2 0
3 9
4 0
5 0
6 0
7 931
8 0
9 0
10 0

Any ideas about this? Thanks for your time xpcman.
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xpcman Posts 19532 Registration date Wednesday October 8, 2008 Status Contributor Last seen June 15, 2019 1,835
Jan 25, 2014 at 03:45 PM
Here is what Memtest86 says about "error confidence value"

Error Confidence Value:
A value that indicates the validity of the errors being reported with
larger values indicating greater validity. There is a high probability
that all errors reported are valid regardless of this value. However,
when this value exceeds 100 it is nearly impossible that the reported
errors will be invalid.
So I suspect one of your memory modules is bad.

Once a memory error has been detected, determining the failing SIMM/DIMM module is not a clear cut procedure. With the large number of motherboard vendors and possible combinations of memory slots it would be difficult if not impossible to assemble complete information about how a particular error would map to a failing memory module. However, there are steps that may be taken to determine the failing module. Here are four techniques that you may wish to use:

Removing modules

This is simplest method for isolating a failing modules, but may only be employed when one or more modules can be removed from the system. By selectively removing modules from the system and then running the test you will be able to find the bad modules. Be sure to note exactly which modules are in the system when the test passes and when the test fails.
Rotating modules

When none of the modules can be removed then you may wish to rotate modules to find the failing one. This technique can only be used if there are three or more modules in the system. Change the location of two modules at a time. For example put the module from slot 1 into slot 2 and put the module from slot 2 in slot 1. Run the test and if either the failing bit or address changes then you know that the failing module is one of the ones just moved. By using several combinations of module movement you should be able to determine which module is failing.
Replacing modules

If you are unable to use either of the previous techniques then you are left to selective replacement of modules to find the failure.


Good Luck
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Kamon358 Posts 7 Registration date Sunday May 20, 2012 Status Member Last seen January 26, 2014
Jan 26, 2014 at 05:28 AM
Thank you for your advise xpcman, I will try this techniques. But after i did the memory test, witch was the first thing I did after turning the pc on, the bsod didn't
show up any more. Than I did a test with "windows memory diagnostic" and it showed no problems. Does this mean some thing? Can this problem happen because of electricity problems, because in my country in winter the electricity is with problems, and I have had electricity problems in the past.

Thank you for your help.
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xpcman Posts 19532 Registration date Wednesday October 8, 2008 Status Contributor Last seen June 15, 2019 1,835
Jan 26, 2014 at 08:39 PM
Almost anything can happen with power line problems. A UPS with a big battery can often avoid power problems. I think that one of your memory modules is marginal and might cause problems again.

Good Luck
0