A partition on a hard drive has disappeared

Pendler8 4 Posts Saturday August 4, 2018Registration date August 16, 2018 Last seen - Aug 4, 2018 at 06:07 AM - Latest reply: Pendler8 4 Posts Saturday August 4, 2018Registration date August 16, 2018 Last seen
- Aug 16, 2018 at 05:04 AM
The mother board of an old PC died. The partitioned hard drive was still okay. The hard drive had a "C: Windows" and a "D: Data" partition. I hooked it into a new PC and only the D: part shows up. I looked in Diskmgmt. It is also not there. I even hooked it direct into the SATA connection of the main drive and the other partition still does not show. I tried to attach a screen shot but only nonsense was inserted.
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kieferschild 2434 Posts Sunday October 5, 2008Registration dateModeratorStatus October 4, 2018 Last seen - Aug 9, 2018 at 07:27 AM
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Hi,

did you have more than one hard drive on your machine?
Pendler8 4 Posts Saturday August 4, 2018Registration date August 16, 2018 Last seen - Aug 10, 2018 at 04:28 AM
A fair question. When I could not find the second "drive", I began to doubt my memory. I was 99% sure that the 2 drives I had were actually just one partitioned drive. When I could not find the one drive and the other was just fine, I opened my old PC up and scoured for a another drive. I found neither another standard drive nor a solid state drive.

Thanks for the idea.
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kieferschild 2434 Posts Sunday October 5, 2008Registration dateModeratorStatus October 4, 2018 Last seen - Aug 10, 2018 at 08:46 AM
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Can you put the drive on a PC and use DISKPART to SEL DISK x then LIST VOL

can you send us a screenshot of the volumes.
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Pendler8 4 Posts Saturday August 4, 2018Registration date August 16, 2018 Last seen - Aug 10, 2018 at 08:52 AM
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DiskMgt and Volume Screenshots here.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/cr4wm17vvt4bc44/AAB4AWAT7WhnaZWCxw9_A64Za?dl=0
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kieferschild 2434 Posts Sunday October 5, 2008Registration dateModeratorStatus October 4, 2018 Last seen - Aug 13, 2018 at 07:10 AM
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How big was the HDD From the old PC?

Are you sure theres no other hard drive?


There are no other hard drives on the PC. I opened it up and even plugged in the DVD drive into a SATA connection in case something was hiding there. There is nothing that even vaguely looks like a regular or solid state drive. Unless it was built right into the mother board or video card, I can find no other drive. This confirms that the „C:“ and „D:“ drives that I saw on the old PC were actually one partitioned drive. I remember this being in the specs.

The old drive was 3000GB. It shows only the „D:“ files, but has 1.91 TB of data on it. This would be about right for both (C+D) drives together. I remember the D drive being only about 40% full (ca. 1.4 TB) and the C drive being completely full at ca. 0.5 TB. I never wrote this down, so I cannot be sure. In any case, the data must be there somewhere or I’m missing something.

Do you think a PC repair person could repair/replace the mother board and get the old PC running again? The BIOS had become corrupt and the PC would not start. I could not even get to the start-up screen or the command line. It went into a continuous loop seconds after being turned on. Dell refused service. The PC was roughly 8 years old.

Thanks for sticking with me. This is a real mystery movie.
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kieferschild 2434 Posts Sunday October 5, 2008Registration dateModeratorStatus October 4, 2018 Last seen - Aug 14, 2018 at 06:47 AM
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You've managed to delete your C partition.

C and D cannot exist on one partition.

It looks like you've managed to wipe the C partition and extend the D partition to cover the full size of the drive.

you wouldnt have been able to do this whilst the computer was booted up in to Windows.

Have you been playing about with partition resizing?

You will need to try some software to try and recovery your C partition.

Give this a try: https://www.easeus.com/partition-recovery/index.htm

You could take your PC in to a shop for repair but if it's 8 years old i wouldnt bother.

even if the motherboard was replaced, the PC would not boot because there is no Windows installation.

your boot manager is missing, as is your active partition.

It looks like I may be out of luck. I did not purposefully try to resize the partitions, but I did explore all of the windows disk management tools. I might have accidentally changed something. The problem is that the „C:“ partition was missing from the very beginning. I have not seen evidence of it since my old PC died. If something changed, it changed at the first boot on another computer.

I tried the EASEUS software last week. I did „partition recovery“ and it says „Unsupported Disk“, „Dynamic Disk, GPT disk and bad disk are not supported“. I also did „data recovery“ and it found lost data, but none of it looks like what I am missing. I also ran AOMEI Partition Assistent. It found nothing after a 24 hour scan, but it did show a 128 MB „partition“ on the drive that had no letter. This is way too small, but interesting. There are some „lost files“ on this partition, but they all look like system files.
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kieferschild 2434 Posts Sunday October 5, 2008Registration dateModeratorStatus October 4, 2018 Last seen - Aug 16, 2018 at 04:54 AM
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Did you ever have a C partition?

Do you have a WINDOWS folder on your "DATA" partition?
Pendler8 4 Posts Saturday August 4, 2018Registration date August 16, 2018 Last seen - Aug 16, 2018 at 05:04 AM
I definitely did have a C partition on the old PC. The Data partition has no windows folder. As soon as I hooked up the old drive to my new PC, the C partition was no longer there. I tried on another PC to be sure it wasn‘t something with the new PC and also connected the drive directly into the motherboard (rather than through a USB-SATA connector). No evidence of the „C“-„Windows“ drive has been detected. I realize that this makes no sense. I am missing something, but I am clueless as to what.
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